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Gkermit binary options

The G-Kermit binary is called "gkermit". To run G-Kermit, just type "gkermit" followed by command-line options that tell it what to do. If no options are given, it prints a usage message listing the available options. If an option takes an argument, the argument is required Friday, 14 July Gkermit Binary Options.

If you have a direct or dialup serial connection into Unix, use the "stty -a" or "stty all" command to see if your Unix terminal driver is conditioned for the appropriate kind of flow control; if it isn't, very few applications including gkermit will work well, or at all. When you have a network connection, flow control is usually nothing to worry about, since the network protocol TCP or X. The G-Kermit binary is called "gkermit". To run G-Kermit, just type "gkermit" followed by command- line options that tell it what to do.

The action options are -r, -s, and -g. Only one action option may be given. If no action options are given, G-Kermit does nothing except possibly printing its usage message or creating a debug. Options that do not take arguments can be "bundled" with other options.

An option that takes an argument must always be followed by a space and then its argument s. G-Kermit's exit status is 0 if all operations succeeded and 1 if there were any failures. If a group of files was transferred, the exit status is 1 if one or more files was not successfully transferred and 0 if all of them were transferred successfully. Regular expressions are interpreted and expanded by your shell into the list of names of files that is given to G-Kermit.

It is useful only when your terminal emulator supports the Kermit autodownload feature AND it includes a Kermit server mode. It is equivalent to "gkermit -r", escaping back, telling your terminal emulator to send the given files, and then reconnecting to Unix. For example, "gkermit -s game -a work" sends the file called "game" under the name "work", so the receiver will think its name is "work".

When given with the -r or -g command, the incoming file or the first incoming file if there is more than one is stored under the name fn. In all cases, the given name is used as-is; it is not converted. When used with -s, tells G-Kermit to send in binary mode. When used with -r, tells G-Kermit to receive in binary mode if the file sender does not specify the transfer mode text or binary.

When used with -g, tells G-Kermit to ask your terminal emulator's Kermit to send the given file in binary mode. See Section 6 for details. When used with -s, tells G-Kermit to send in text mode. When used with -r, tells G-Kermit to receive in text mode if the file sender does not specify the transfer mode text or binary. When used with -g, tells G-Kermit to ask your emulator's Kermit to send the given file in text mode.

Normally when sending files, G-Kermit converts filenames to a form that should be acceptable to non-Unix platforms, primarily changing lowercase letters to uppercase, ensuring there is no more than one period, and replacing any "funny" characters by X or underscore explained in Section 8. When receiving, and an incoming file has the same name as an existing file, write over the existing file. By default G-Kermit backs up the existing file by adding a suffix to its name see Section 9. Normally when receiving files, and a file transfer is interrupted, G-Kermit discards the partially received file so you won't think you have the whole file.

Include -K on the command line to tell G-Kermit to keep partially received files, e. The default length on most platforms is Use this option to specify a different length; usually this would be necessary only if transfers fail using the default length due to some kind of buffering problem in the host or along the communication path. Example: "gkermit -e -r". Specify the number of seconds to wait for a packet before timing out and retransmitting. By default, G-Kermit uses whatever timeout interval your terminal emulator's Kermit asks it to use.

No need to change this unless the timeout action causes problems. Try this if uploads fail without it. But don't use it if you don't need to; on some platforms or connections it hurts rather than helps. Streaming is a high-performance option to be used on reliable connections, such as in Telnet or Rlogin sessions. It is used if your terminal emulator's Kermit requests it.

Use the -S option note: uppercase S to suppress this feature in case it causes trouble. Details in Section If you omit this switch when using G-Kermit as an external protocol to another communications program, G-Kermit is likely to perform illegal operations and exit prematurely.

If you include this switch when G-Kermit is NOT an external protocol to another program, file transfers will fail. G-Kermit has no way of determining automatically whether it is being used as an external protocol. Suppresses messages. Use this for troubleshooting. It creates a file called debug.

More about this in Section These are processed before the actual command-line options and so can be overridden by them. The connection can be serial direct or dialed or network Telnet, Rlogin, X. What happens next depends on the capabilities of your terminal emulator:. If your emulator supports Kermit "autodownloads" then it receives the file automatically and puts you back in the terminal screen when done. When the transfer is complete, you might have to instruct your emulator to go back to its terminal screen.

During file transfer, most terminal emulators put up some kind of running display of the file transfer progress. Autodownload is not effective in this case. When the transfer is complete, you'll need to instruct your emulator to return to its terminal screen.

The method for interrupting a transfer depends on your terminal emulator. For example, while the file-transfer display is active, you might type the letter 'x' to cancel the current file and go on to the next one if any , and the letter 'z' to cancel the group. Or there might be buttons you can click with your mouse.

When G-Kermit is in packet mode and your terminal emulator is in its terminal screen, you can also type three 3 Ctrl-C characters in a row to make G-Kermit exit and restore the normal terminal modes. This mode is appropriate for program binaries, graphics files, tar archives, compressed files, etc, and is G-Kermit's default file-transfer mode when sending. When receiving files in binary mode, G-Kermit simply copies each byte to disk. Obviously the bytes are encoded for transmission, but the encoding and decoding procedures give a replica of the original file after transfer.

When sending files in text mode, G-Kermit converts the record format to the common one that is defined for the Kermit protocol, namely lines terminated by carriage return and linefeed CRLF ; the receiver converts the CRLFs to whatever line-end or record-format convention is used on its platform.

When receiving files in text mode, G-Kermit simply strips carriage returns, leaving only a linefeed at the end of each line, which is the Unix convention. When receiving files, the sender's transfer mode text or binary predominates if the sender gives this information to G-Kermit in a Kermit File Attribute packet, which of course depends on whether your terminal emulator's Kermit protocol has this feature.

Otherwise, if you gave a -i or -T option on the gkermit command line, the corresponding mode is used; otherwise the default mode binary is used. Furthermore, when either sending or receiving, G-Kermit and your terminal emulator's Kermit can inform each other of their OS type Unix in G-Kermit's case. If your emulator supports this capability, which is called "automatic peer recognition", and it tells G-Kermit that its platform is also Unix, G-Kermit and the emulator's Kermit automatically switch into binary mode, since no record-format conversion is necessary in this case.

Automatic peer recognition is disabled automatically if you include the -i image or -T text option. When sending, G-Kermit sends all files in the same mode, text or binary. There is no automatic per-file mode switching. When receiving, however, per-file switching occurs automatically based on the incoming Attribute packets, if any explained below , that accompany each file, so if the file sender switches types between files, G-Kermit follows along.

It depends on the shell to expand metacharacters wildcards and tilde. G-Kermit uses the full pathname given to find and open the file, but then strips the pathname before sending the name to the receiver. What the receiver does with the pathname is, of course, up to the receiver, which might have various options for dealing with incoming pathnames.

If the incoming filename includes a path, G-Kermit tries to store the file in the specified place. If the path does not exist, the transfer fails. The incoming filename can, of course, be superseded with the -a option. So, for example, gkermit. When receiving a file, if the name is all uppercase, G-Kermit converts it to all lowercase. If the name contains any lowercase letters, G-Kermit leaves the name alone. Otherwise G-Kermit accepts filename characters as they are, since Unix allows filenames to contain practically any characters.

If the automatic peer recognition feature is available in the terminal emulator, and G-Kermit recognizes the emulator's platform as Unix, G-Kermit automatically disables filename conversion and sends and accepts filenames literally. You can force literal filenames by including the -P option on the command line.

The suffix is ". But since G-Kermit does not read directories see Implementation Notes below , it can not guarantee that the number chosen will be higher than any other backup prefix number for the same file. In fact, the first free number, starting from 1, is chosen. If an incoming file already has a backup suffix, G-Kermit strips it before adding a new one, rather than creating a file that has two backup suffixes.

To defeat the backup feature and have incoming files overwrite existing files of the same name, include the -w writeover option on the command line. If G-Kermit has not been been given the -w option and it fails to create a backup file, the transfer fails. If the other Kermit does not agree, both Kermits automatically drop down to the single-byte 6-bit checksum that is required of all Kermit implementations. Attributes When sending files, G-Kermit conveys the file transfer mode and file size in bytes to the receiver in an Attribute A packet if the use of A-packets was negotiated.

When receiving, G-Kermit looks in the incoming A-packet, if any, for the transfer mode text or binary and switches itself accordingly on a per-file basis. Handling of the Eighth Bit G-Kermit normally treats the 8th bit of each byte as a normal data bit. But if you have a 7-bit connection, transfers of 8-bit files fail unless you tell one or both Kermits to use the appropriate kind of parity, in which case Kermit uses single-shift escaping for 8-bit bytes.

Generally, telling either Kermit is sufficient; it tells the other. Use the -p option to tell G-Kermit which parity to use. Locking shifts are not included in G-Kermit. When receiving, it accepts both escaped and bare control characters, including NUL 0. Packet Length All legal packet lengths, , are supported although a lower maximum might be imposed on platforms where it is known that bigger ones don't work.

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If no options are given, it prints a usage message listing the available options. If an option takes an argument, the argument is required Friday, 14 July Gkermit Binary Options. I didn't plan on doing this video but Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. G-Kermit s options are compatible with C-Kermit s, with the following exceptions.

To transfer files with G-Kermit you must be connected through a terminal emulator to the Unix system where G-Kermit is installed, meaning you are online to Unix and have access to the shell prompt or to some menu that has an option to invoke G-Kermit , and your terminal emulator must support the Kermit file transfer protocol The connection can be serial direct or dialed or network Telnet, Rlogin, X 25, etc.

Sending Files. If your emulator supports Kermit autodownloads then it receives the file automatically and puts you back in the terminal screen when done. Otherwise, you ll need to take whatever action is required by your emulator to get its attention a mouse action, a keystroke like Alt - x or a character sequence like Ctrl - or Ctrl - followed by the letter c this is called escaping back and then tell it to receive the file When the transfer is complete, you might have to instruct your emulator to go back to its terminal screen.

During file transfer, most terminal emulators pu t up some kind of running display of the file transfer progress. Receiving Files. When you tell G-Kermit to RECEIVE, this requires you to escape back to your terminal emulator and instruct it to send the desired file s Autodownload is not effective in this case When the transfer is complete, you ll need to instruct your emulator to return to its terminal screen.

Getting Files. G-Kermit supports file and group interruption The method for interrupting a transfer depends on your terminal emulator For example, while the file-transfer display is active, you might type the letter x to cancel the current file and go on to the next one if any , and the letter z to cancel the group Or there might be buttons you can click with your mouse. When G-Kermit is in packet mode and your terminal emulator is i n its terminal screen, you can also type three 3 Ctrl-C characters in a row to make G-Kermit exit and restore the normal terminal modes.

When sending files in binary mode, G-Kermit sends every byte exactly as it appears in the file This mode is appropriate for program binaries, graphics files, tar archives, compressed files, etc, and is G-Kermit s default file-transfer mode when sending When receiving files in binary mode, G-Kermit simply copies each byte to disk Obviously the bytes are encoded for transmission, but the encoding and decoding procedures give a replica of the original file after transfer.

When sending files in text mode, G-Kermit converts the record format to the common one that is defined for the Kermit protocol, namely lines terminated by carriage return and linefeed CRLF the receiver converts the CRLFs to whatever line-end or record-format convention is used on its platform When receiving files in text mode, G-Kermit simply strips carriage returns, leaving only a linef eed at the end of each line, which is the Unix convention.

When receiving files, the sender s transfer mode text or binary predominates if the sender gives this information to G-Kermit in a Kermit File Attribute packet, which of course depends on whether your terminal emulator s Kermit protocol has this feature Otherwise, if you gave a - i or - T option on the gkermit command line, the corresponding mode is used otherwise the default mode binary is used. Furthermore, when either sending or receiving, G-Kermit and your terminal emulator s Kermit can inform each other of their OS type Unix in G-Kermit s case If your emulator supports this capability, which is called automatic peer recognition , and it tells G-Kermit that its platform is also Unix, G-Kermit and the emulator s Kermit automatically switch into binary mode, since no record-format conversion is necessary in this case Automatic peer recognition is disabled automatically if you include the - i image or - T text option.

When sending, G - Kermit sends all files in the same mode, text or binary There is no automatic per-file mode switching When receiving, however, per-file switching occurs automatically based on the incoming Attribute packets, if any explained below , that accompany each file, so if the file sender switches types between files, G-Kermit follows along. G-Kermit uses the full pathname given to find and open the file, but then strips the pathname before sending the name to the receiver For example.

This example sends the etc hosts file but tells the receiver that its name is tmp hosts What the receiver does with the pathname is, of course, up to the receiver , which might have various options for dealing with incoming pathnames. When RECEIVING a file, G-Kermit does NOT strip the pathname, since incoming files normally do not include a pathname unless you told your terminal to include them or gave an as-name including a path when sending to G-Kermit If the incoming filename includes a path, G-Kermit tries to store the file in the specified place If the path does not exist, the transfer fails The incoming filename can, of course, be superseded with the - a option.

When sending a file, G-Kermit normally converts outbound filenames to common form uppercase, no more than one period, and no funny characters So, for example, would be sent as. When receiving a file, if the name is all uppercase, G-Kermit converts it to all lowercase If the name contains any lowercase letters, G-Kermit leaves the name alone Otherwise G-Kermit accepts filename characters as they are, since Unix allows filenames to contain practically any characters.

If the automatic peer recognition feature is available in the terminal emulator, and G-Kermit recognizes the emulator s platform as Unix, G-Kermit automatically disables filename conversion and sends and accepts filenames literally. You can force literal filenames by including the - P option on the command line.

When G-Kermit receives a file whose name is the same as that of an existing file, G-Kermit backs up the existing file by adding a unique suffix to its name The suffix is. To defeat the backup feature and have incoming files overwrite existing files of the same name, include the - w writeover option on the command line. If G-Kermit has not been given the - w option and it fails to create a backup file, the transfer fails.

Block check G-Kermit uses the 3-byte, bit CRC by default If the other Kermit does not agree, both Kermits automatically drop down to the single-byte 6-bit checksum that is required of all Ker mit implementations. Attributes When sending files, G-Kermit conveys the file transfer mode and file size in bytes to the receiver in an Attribute A packet if the use of A-packets was negotiated This allows the receiver to switch to the appropriate mode automatically, and to display the percent done, estimated time left, and or a thermometer bar if it has that capability When receiving, G-Kermit looks in the incoming A-packet, if any, for the transfer mode text or binary and switches itself accordingly on a per-file basis.

Handling of the Eighth Bit G-Kermit normally treats the 8th bit of each byte as a normal data bit But if you have a 7-bit connection, transfers of 8-bit files fail unless you tell one or both Kermits to use the appropriate kind of parity, in which case Kermit uses single-shift escaping for 8-bit bytes Generally, telling either Kermit is sufficient it tells the other Use the - p option to tell G-Kermit which parity to use Locking shifts are not included in G-Kermit.

Packet Length All legal packet lengths, , are supported although a lower maximum might be imposed on platforms where it is known that bigger ones don t work When receiving, G-Kermit sends its receive packet length to the sender, and the sender must not send packets any longer than this length The default length for most platforms is and it may be overridden with the - e command-line option. Sliding Windows G-Kermit does not support sliding windows Streaming is used instead If the other Kermit bids to use sliding windows, G-Kermit declin es.

If file transfers fail. Make sure your Unix terminal is conditioned for the appropriate kind of flow control. Use command-line options to back off on performance and transparency use - S to disable streaming, - e to select a shorter packet length, - p to se lect space or other parity, - b to increase or disable the timeout, and or establish the corresponding settings on your emulator. If you have a TCP IP connection e g Telnet or Rlogin to Unix from a terminal emulator whose Kermit protocol does not support streaming, downloads from G-Kermit are likely to be as much as 10 or even times slower than uploads if the TCP IP stack engages in Nagle or Delayed ACK heuristics typically, when your terminal emulator s Kermit protocol sends an acknowledgment, the TCP stack holds on to it for say 1 5 second before sending it, because it is too small to send right away.

As noted in Section 9 the backup prefix is not guaranteed to be the highest number For example, if you have files. If you send a file to G-Kermit with streaming active when the connection is not truly reliable, all bets are off A fatal error should occur promptly, but if huge amounts of data are lost, G-Kermit might never recognize a single data packet and therefore not diagnose a single error yet your terminal emulator keeps sending packets since no acknowledgments are expected the transfer eventually hangs at the end of file Use - S on G-Kermit s command line to disable streaming in situations where the terminal emulator requests it in error.

You can use G-Kermit s debug log for troubleshooting this is useful mainly in conjunction with the source code But even if you aren t a C programmer, it should reveal any problem in enough detail to help pinpoint the cause of the failure gkermit - d wi th no action options writes a short file that shows the build options and settings. The debug log is also a packet log to extract the packets from it, use.

Packets in the log are truncated to avoid wrap-around on your screen, and they have the Ctrl-A packet-start converted to and A to avoid triggering a spurious autodownload when displaying the log on your screen. In certain circumstances it is not desirable or possible to use - d to create a log file called in the current directory for example, if you don t have write access to the current directory, or you already have a file that you want to keep or transfer In this case, you can include a filename argument after - d.

This is an exception to the rule that option arguments are not optional. If all else fails, you can contact the Kermit Project for technical support see. G-Kermit is written to require the absolute bare minimum in system services and C-language features and libraries, and therefore should be portable to practically any Unix platform at all with any C compiler.

When I wrote G-Kermit in , I wanted it to serve as an example of a program that would last forever, and not need constant updates and upgrades and patches which are the hallmark of modern software culture, where stability is a forgotten concept in programming language design just as backwards compatibility is in operating system and library releases But the world keeps changing out from under G-Kermit and every other software program on every modern platform unlike, for example, the IBM OS MVS operating system for which I wrote software in something that has never needed upgrades or updates or patches to keep working decade after decade Anyway, in Unix the biggest change affecting G-Kermit is migration of the errno variable from a simple int to some kind of object or macro defined in a header file Thus the most common complaint from those trying to build G-Kermit on Linux or wherever is fatal compilation or link-time errors involving errno The solution is to include.

I m not inclined to make a new release just because of bureaucratic reshuffling of header files or requirement of prototypes where they weren t required before, because disregard for stability should not be rewarded A program, once written, should stay written, so the programmer can go on to something new, rather than writing the same program over and over and over simply to comply with whatever new thing somebody dreamed up Anyway, G-Kermit is GPL so anybody can change it however they want Yes, the whole thing could just be engineered for autoconf, but autoconf is not available on all the platforms where G-Kermit is built.

The source files are. Note that the target names are all lowercase posix is the default target the one used if you just type make If the build fails with a message like. Some special build targets are also provided. Several maintenance management targets are also included. No other tools beyond make, the C compiler and linker, a short list of invariant header files, and the standard C library are needed or used The resulting binary should be K or less on all hardware platforms and 64K or less on most see list below.

CHAR char Include this if compilation fails with unknown type unsigned char. MAXRP nnn Change the maximum receive-packet length to something other than t he default, which is about You should change this only to make it smaller making it bigger is not supported by the Kermit protocol.

DEFRP nnn Change the default receive packet length to something other than the default, which is Making it any bigger than this is not advised. Passing arg 2 of signal from incompatible pointer or Argument incompatible with prototype Because no two Unix platforms agree about signal handlers Harmless because the signal handler does not return a value that is used We don t want to open the door to platform-specific ifdef s just to silence this warning However, you can include - DSIGI or - DSIGV on the CC command line to override the default definitions.

Do you mean equality No, in while c s the assignment really is intentional. Condition is always true Yes, while 1 is always true. Flow between cases Intentional. No flow into statement In gproto c because it is a case statement generated by machine, not written by a human. The coding conventions are aimed at maximum portability For example.

Only relatively short identifiers. No long character-string constants. Only ifdef else endif define and undef preprocessor directives. No gmake-specific constructs in the makefile. Here are some sample builds. POSIX APIs not available in this antique OS circa Also due to limited terminal input buffering capacity, streaming must be disabled and relatively short packets must be used when receiving gkermit - Se - r However, it can use streaming when sending.

This is a bit architecture A special makefile target is needed because its make program does not expand the CC val ue when invoking second-level makes Packet and buffer sizes are reduced to keep static data within limits Overlays are not needed. You can view it with. Rename and store it appropriately so users can access it with man gkermit In addition, the README should be made available in a public documentation directory as.

The makefile includes a sample install target that does all this Please read it before use to be sure the appropriate directories and permissions are indicated There is also an uninstall target to undo an installation Obviously you need write access to the relevant directories before you can install or uninstall G-Kermit. A primary ob jective in developing G-Kermit is that it can be released and used forever without constant updates to account for platform idiosyncracies and changes For this reason, certain features have been deliberately omitted.

File timestamps The methods for dealing with internal time formats are notoriously unportable and also a moving target, especially now with the bit internal time format rollover looming in and the timet data type changing out from under us Furthermore, by excluding any date-handling code, G-Kermit is automatically Y2K, , and Y10K compliant. Internal wildcard expansion, recursive directory traversal, etc Even after more than 30 years no, make that 40 , there is still no standard and portable service in Unix for this.

Server mode, because it would require internal wildcard expansion.

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Furthermore, when either sending or receiving, G-Kermit and your terminal emulator's Kermit can inform each other of their OS type Unix in G-Kermit's case. If your emulator supports this capability, which is called "automatic peer recognition", and it tells G-Kermit that its platform is also Unix, G-Kermit and the emulator's Kermit automatically switch into binary mode, since no record-format conversion is necessary in this case. Automatic peer recognition is disabled automatically if you include the -i image or -T text option.

When sending, G-Kermit sends all files in the same mode, text or binary. There is no automatic per-file mode switching. When receiving, however, per-file switching occurs automatically based on the incoming Attribute packets, if any explained below , that accompany each file, so if the file sender switches types between files, G-Kermit follows along. It depends on the shell to expand metacharacters wildcards and tilde. G-Kermit uses the full pathname given to find and open the file, but then strips the pathname before sending the name to the receiver.

What the receiver does with the pathname is, of course, up to the receiver, which might have various options for dealing with incoming pathnames. If the incoming filename includes a path, G-Kermit tries to store the file in the specified place. If the path does not exist, the transfer fails. The incoming filename can, of course, be superseded with the -a option. So, for example, gkermit. When receiving a file, if the name is all uppercase, G-Kermit converts it to all lowercase.

If the name contains any lowercase letters, G-Kermit leaves the name alone. Otherwise G-Kermit accepts filename characters as they are, since Unix allows filenames to contain practically any characters. If the automatic peer recognition feature is available in the terminal emulator, and G-Kermit recognizes the emulator's platform as Unix, G-Kermit automatically disables filename conversion and sends and accepts filenames literally. You can force literal filenames by including the -P option on the command line.

The suffix is ". But since G-Kermit does not read directories see Implementation Notes , it can not guarantee that the number chosen will be higher than any other backup prefix number for the same file. In fact, the first free number, starting from 1, is chosen. If an incoming file already has a backup suffix, G-Kermit strips it before adding a new one, rather than creating a file that has two backup suffixes.

To defeat the backup feature and have incoming files overwrite existing files of the same name, include the -w writeover option on the command line. If G-Kermit has not been given the -w option and it fails to create a backup file, the transfer fails. If the other Kermit does not agree, both Kermits automatically drop down to the single-byte 6-bit checksum that is required of all Kermit implementations.

Attributes When sending files, G-Kermit conveys the file transfer mode and file size in bytes to the receiver in an Attribute A packet if the use of A-packets was negotiated. When receiving, G-Kermit looks in the incoming A-packet, if any, for the transfer mode text or binary and switches itself accordingly on a per-file basis.

Handling of the Eighth Bit G-Kermit normally treats the 8th bit of each byte as a normal data bit. But if you have a 7-bit connection, transfers of 8-bit files fail unless you tell one or both Kermits to use the appropriate kind of parity, in which case Kermit uses single-shift escaping for 8-bit bytes.

Generally, telling either Kermit is sufficient; it tells the other. Use the -p option to tell G-Kermit which parity to use. Locking shifts are not included in G-Kermit. When receiving, it accepts both escaped and bare control characters, including NUL 0.

Packet Length All legal packet lengths, , are supported although a lower maximum might be imposed on platforms where it is known that bigger ones don't work. When receiving, G-Kermit sends its receive packet length to the sender, and the sender must not send packets any longer than this length.

The default length for most platforms is and it may be overridden with the -e command-line option. Sliding Windows G-Kermit does not support sliding windows. Streaming is used instead. If the other Kermit bids to use sliding windows, G-Kermit declines. When streaming is in use on a particular connection, Kermit speeds are comparable to FTP. The drawback of streaming is that transmission errors are fatal; that's why streaming is only used on reliable connections, which, by definition, guarantee there will be no transmission errors.

However, watch out for the relatively rare circumstance in which the emulator thinks it has a reliable connection when it doesn't -- for example a Telnet connection to a terminal server, and a dialout from the terminal server to the host. Use the -S option on the command line to defeat streaming in such situations. When in doubt, instruct the file sender to prefix all control characters e.

Make sure your Unix terminal is conditioned for the appropriate kind of flow control. As noted in Section 9 , the backup prefix is not guaranteed to be the highest number. For example, if you have files oofa. This is because gkermit lacks directory reading capabilities, for reasons noted in Section 14 , and without this, finding the highest existing backup number for a file is impractical.

If you send a file to G-Kermit with streaming active when the connection is not truly reliable, all bets are off. A fatal error should occur promptly, but if huge amounts of data are lost, G-Kermit might never recognize a single data packet and therefore not diagnose a single error; yet your terminal emulator keeps sending packets since no acknowledgments are expected; the transfer eventually hangs at the end of file.

Use -S on G-Kermit's command line to disable streaming in situations where the terminal emulator requests it in error. You can use G-Kermit's debug log for troubleshooting; this is useful mainly in conjunction with the source code. But even if you aren't a C programmer, it should reveal any problem in enough detail to help pinpoint the cause of the failure.

In certain circumstances it is not desirable or possible to use -d to create a log file called debug. When I wrote G-Kermit in , I wanted it to serve as an example of a program that would last forever, and not need constant "updates" and "upgrades" and "patches" which are the hallmark of modern software culture, where stability is a forgotten concept in programming language design just as backwards compatibility is in operating system and library releases.

Anyway, in Unix the biggest change affecting G-Kermit is migration of the errno variable from a simple int to some kind of object or macro defined in a header file. Thus the most common complaint from those trying to build G-Kermit on Linux or wherever is fatal compilation or link-time errors involving errno. Other errors are increasingly reported that are solved by including ever more header files in gkermit.

A program, once written, should stay written, so the programmer can go on to something new, rather than writing the same program over and over and over simply to "comply" with whatever new thing somebody dreamed up. Yes, the whole thing could just be engineered for autoconf, but autoconf is not available on all the platforms where G-Kermit is built. The source files are: makefile The build procedure gwart. This is the default target, used if you type "make" or "gmake" alone. Note that the target names are all lowercase; "posix" is the default target the one used if you just type "make".

If the build fails with a message like: gunixio. See the build list below for examples. The default compiler is cc. To override e. The resulting binary should be K or less on all hardware platforms and 64K or less on most; see list below. You should change this only to make it smaller; making it bigger is not supported by the Kermit protocol.

Making it any bigger than this is not advised. If downloads work but uploads consistently fail or fail consistently whenever streaming is used or the packet length is greater than a certain number like , or , try adding this option. When gkermit is built with this option, it is equivalent to the user always giving the -x option on the command line. Include this if you get Unresolved Extern complaints about errno at link time. This is set automatically for BSD builds.

Any compiler warnings should be harmless. Harmless because the signal handler does not return a value that is used. We don't want to open the door to platform-specific ifdef s just to silence this warning. Others might be declared in system header files like mknod, lstat, etc, which are not used by G-Kermit.

The coding conventions are aimed at maximum portability. For example: Only relatively short identifiers. No long character-string constants. Only ifdef , else , endif , define , and undef preprocessor directives. No gmake-specific constructs in the makefile. Also due to limited terminal input buffering capacity, streaming must be disabled and relatively short packets must be used when receiving: "gkermit -Se -r". However, it can use streaming when sending. No special build procedures needed.

It builds but doesn't work, reason unknown, but probably because it was never designed to be accessed remotely in the first place. This is a bit architecture. Packet and buffer sizes are reduced to keep static data within limits. Overlays are not needed. Identifiers must be unique within the first 7 characters.

Unfortunately, there is a conflict in gproto. When using, disable streaming and use shorter-than-usual packets. It needs no special permissions other than read, write, and execute for the desired users and groups: no setuid, no setgid, or any other form of privilege. G-Kermit is not a dialout program. The executable should be called "gkermit" and not "kermit", since "kermit" is the binary name for C-Kermit, and the two are likely to be installed side by side on the same computer; even when they are not, consistent naming is better for support and sanity purposes.

There is also a short man page: gkermit. Please read it before use to be sure the appropriate directories and permissions are indicated. For example, while the file-transfer display is active, you might type the letter 'x' to cancel the current file and go on to the next one if any , and the letter 'z' to cancel the group. Or there might be buttons you can click with your mouse. When G-Kermit is in packet mode and your terminal emulator is in its terminal screen, you can also type three 3 Ctrl-C characters in a row to make G-Kermit exit and restore the normal terminal modes.

This mode is appropriate for program binaries, graphics files, tar archives, compressed files, etc, and is G-Kermit's default file transfer mode when sending. When receiving files in binary mode, G-Kermit simply copies each byte to disk. Obviously the bytes are encoded for transmission, but the encoding and decoding procedures give a replica of the original file after transfer.

When sending files in text mode, G-Kermit converts the record format to the common one that is defined for the Kermit protocol, namely lines terminated by carriage return and linefeed CRLF ; the receiver converts the CRLFs to whatever line-end or record-format convention is used on its platform.

When receiving files in text mode, G-Kermit simply strips carriage returns, leaving only a linefeed at the end of each line, which is the UNIX convention. When receiving files, the sender's transfer mode text or binary predominates if the sender gives this information to G-Kermit in a Kermit File Attribute packet, which of course depends on whether your terminal emulator's Kermit protocol has this feature.

Otherwise, if you gave a -i or -T option on the gkermit command line, the corresponding mode is used; otherwise the default mode binary is used. If your emulator supports this capability, which is called "automatic peer recognition", and it tells G-Kermit that its platform is also UNIX, G-Kermit and the emulator's Kermit automatically switch into binary mode, since no record-format conversion is necessary in this case.

Automatic peer recognition is disabled automatically if you include the -i image or -T text option. When sending, G-Kermit sends all files in the same mode, text or binary. There is no automatic per-file mode switching. When receiving, however, per-file switching occurs automatically based on the incoming Attribute packets, if any explained below , that accompany each file.

It depends on the shell to expand metacharacters wildcards and tilde. G-Kermit uses the full pathname given to find and open the file, but then strips the pathname before sending the name to the receiver. What the receiver does with the pathname is, of course, up to the receiver, which might have various options for dealing with incoming pathnames.

If the incoming filename includes a path, G-Kermit tries to store the file in the specified place. If the path does not exist, the transfer fails. The incoming pathname can, of course, be overridden with the -a option. So, for example, gkermit. When receiving a file, if the name is all uppercase, G-Kermit converts it to all lowercase. If the name contains any lowercase letters, G-Kermit leaves the name alone. If the automatic peer recognition feature is available in the terminal emulator, and G-Kermit recognizes the emulator's platform as UNIX, G-Kermit automatically disables filename conversion and sends and accepts filenames literally.

You can force literal filenames by including the -P option on the command line. The suffix is ".

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